HOW TO KNOW MY COMPUTER HAS A VIRUS

A virus attack on home computers these days is actually more of a rare occurrence than it used to be. A virus will easily infect a computer, if that computer has no anti virus protection or a very new type of infection is released on the internet, then picked up by your unprotected computer.

Unless a virus is detected by software designed to find such, one doesn’t know that their computer is infected until strange events start to occur. These types of events show how computer irregularity may be picked up so that you can identify a behavior that points to a virus infection.

• Program or more than one program may take an unusual amount of time to start
• A program may refuse to start at all
• A program may not behave in a normal manner
• If not connected the internet may not connect when you attempt a connection
• Anti virus or anti malware programs may refuse to start or operate
• Your email program refuses to operate or may send messages of its own accord.
• Computer may continually close down

HOW DO YOU KNOW ABOUT ANTI VIRUS SOFTWARE

Many people have anti-virus software installed on their computers. They trust their anti-virus software and rely on these intelligent and powerful tools to protect their system security. However, how do you know about anti-virus software? Is this virus removal tool always mighty in protecting your computer? See what you will get here.

Anti-virus Software, or Safe-defend Software, is a kind of program tool being able to get rid of all the program codes, such as virus and Trojans, etc., which are harmful to a computer.

In recent years, many terms such as Internet Security Suite, Overall Security Suite appear one after another, are also a kind of software used to clean computer viruses, Trojans and malicious software. Anti-virus tool usually integrates utilities including monitoring and identifying, virus scan and removal, as well as automatic update, etc., while some other anti-virus software also has utility on data restoring.

1. It is impossible for anti-virus program to remove all the viruses.

2. The anti-virus software is not always able to remove any virus it has found.

3. On a computer, for each operating system, there should not be two

5 Cool Mouse Operations You Can Use In Windows

Here are five windows operations that you can use on some occasions with windows or associated software.

1 – Open new links in brand new tabs on Windows Internet Explorer

If your mouse has three buttons – then use the middle one to open new tabs. Hover the mouse pointer over the link and press the mouse wheel to open up new tabs.  All you need to do is place the mouse pointer over a link and then press down on the middle mouse button (the mouse wheel).

The middle mouse button is able to roll forward or back, however, it is also able to be pressed down and clicked just like a button.  If you do this on a link then it will open up that link in a new tab.  This is a lot quicker than pressing right-click and clicking on “open in a new tab.”  It is an easier way to research certain items by simply clicking in order to open new tabs.

If you are feeling the super lazy you can hold CTRL and press Tab to scroll through your tabbed

The Battle for Access

If governments fund scientific research, should for-profit publishers be able to copyright the findings? In 2015, Elsevier, a major publisher of academic journals, filed a lawsuit against Sci-Hub, a website started in 2011 that now houses roughly 60 million pirated articles for free download — a violation of copyright law.

In 2016, the case turned an ongoing debate about access to research in the digital age into a public debate. Open-access advocates, like Sci-Hub’s founder, Alexandra Elbakyan, contend that freely sharing research promotes faster innovation. And it doesn’t exclude scientists who work at institutions that can’t afford journal subscriptions, which range from hundreds to tens of thousands of dollars. But traditional “gatekeeper” publishers like Elsevier worry that sites like Sci-Hub could lower standards and promote irresponsible science. Discover asked all sides to weigh in on the future of scientific publishing.

Fred Fenter

Society produces 2.5 million scientific articles per year, a number that’s growing exponentially. Too many of these are still being validated and disseminated according to processes established during the middle of the 20th century. This situation causes inefficiencies and delays in the communication of scientific discovery. Despite the huge advances in information technology,

7-Eleven Drone Deliveries to Rise in 2017

A dozen lucky 7-Eleven customers have already gotten to taste the possibilities of drone food delivery in Reno, Nevada. In November 2016, these customers experienced the futuristic thrill of placing 7-Eleven orders through an app and then watching a hovering delivery drone drop off their order within 10 minutes. Next year, 7-Eleven plans to expand on such drone deliveries in partnership with a company calling itself the “Uber of drone delivery.”

That self-proclaimed “Uber of drone delivery” is not a tech giant such as Amazon or Google, but a delivery drone startup called Flirtey. The startup aims to beat its bigger rivals to the punch by working closely with regulators and large companies around the world to expand its early foothold in the drone delivery market. In the long term, Flirtey is betting that its delivery drones can deliver more convenience at a similar price point as traditional drones.

“Flirtey’s pricing is comparable to current last-mile delivery services,” says Matt Sweeney, CEO of Flirtey. “So Flirtey is a faster and more convenient service at a price point competitive with traditional delivery prices.”

The idea of making drone deliveries as cheap for customers as traditional delivery services is easier said than done. Delivery drones also face certain hurdles in making successful deliveries

Why Amazon Dreams of Flying Warehouses

Amazon gets to play full-time Santa Claus by delivering almost any imaginable item to customers around the world. But the tech giant does not have a magical sleigh pulled by flying reindeer to carry out its delivery orders. Instead, a recent Amazon patent has revealed the breathtaking idea of using giant airships as flying warehouses that could deploy swarms of delivery drones to customers below.

Many patent filings related to new technology often indulge in fantastical flights of fancy. But it’s worth taking a moment to appreciate some of the truly wilder scenarios being imagined within this Amazon patent filing. One scene envisions human or robot workers going to work busily sorting packages aboard airships hovering 45,000 feet above major cities. Another scene imagines the airship’s kitchen whipping up hot or cold food orders that would be loaded onto delivery drones for delivery within minutes.

A third scene anticipates swarms of delivery drones dropping off orders of food or t-shirts to people attending concerts or sports games. Amazon’s patent filing even considers how the airships could fly at much lower altitudes to act as giant billboards or megaphones that advertise and sell items directly to the crowds below.

There is a method to the madness. Amazon

IBM’s Watson Replaces 34 ‘White-Collar’ Employees at Japanese Insurance Company

The impact AI and robotics is having on repetitive manual labor is evident — automobile assembly lines and Amazon’s fulfillment centers are just two examples. But many white-collar jobs are similarly repetitive; they can be broken down into steps and decisions that a machine can easily learn.

The bad news is that jobs have been, and will be, eliminated. By 2021, AI systems could gobble up some 6 percent of U.S. jobs, according to a report from Forrester Research. The World Economic Forum predicts advances in AI could eliminate more than 7 million jobs in 15 of the world’s leading economies over several years.

But here’s the upside: Handing repetitive tasks to machines might free us up for higher-level tasks. The same WEF report notes that AI will create 2 million new jobs in computer science, engineering and mathematics. And leaders from tech giants like Google, IBM and Microsoft have said AI will amplify human abilities rather than fully replace us. Instead of sweating time-consuming repetitive tasks, computers will, perhaps, free us up to tackle challenges that require a human touch.

For example, an AI company called Conversica built a system that sends messages to sales leads to get initial conversations started and gauge interest. The

21st Century Camouflage Confuses Face Detectors

When it comes to disguises, silly mustaches and fake noses won’t cut it anymore.

As facial recognition capabilities grow more sophisticated, cameras and algorithms can to do more with less. Even grainy images, like those you might find on a gas station surveillance camera, can hold enough information to match a face to a database. But there are ways to hide. 

Gathering Knowledge

Your face is garnering a lot of interest these days. Police departments use facial recognition systems to identify criminals. Facebook knows your friends’ faces. Facial recognition is being incorporated into billboards to display ads based on the sex of the person looking at them.

In the not-so-distant future, your face might replace your wallet—a smile will serve as your identification card and credit card. Amazon plans to eliminate the checkout line at its new brick-and-mortar grocery store concept, Amazon Go, in Seattle. How? According to the company’s website:Our checkout-free shopping experience is made possible by the same types of technologies used in self-driving cars: computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning. Our Just Walk Out Technology automatically detects when products are taken from or returned to the shelves and keeps track of them in a virtual

The Future of Computing Depends on Making It Reversible

For more than 50 years, computers have made steady and dramatic improvements, all thanks to Moore’s Law—the exponential increase over time in the number of transistors that can be fabricated on an integrated circuit of a given size. Moore’s Law owed its success to the fact that as transistors were made smaller, they became simultaneously cheaper, faster, and more energy efficient. The ­payoff from this win-win-win scenario enabled reinvestment in semi­conductor fabrication technology that could make even smaller, more densely packed transistors. And so this ­virtuous ­circle continued, decade after decade.

Now though, experts in industry, academia, and government laboratories anticipate that semiconductor miniaturization won’t continue much longer—maybe 5 or 10 years. Making transistors smaller no longer yields the improvements it used to. The physical characteristics of small transistors caused clock speeds to stagnate more than a decade ago, which drove the industry to start building chips with multiple cores. But even multicore architectures must contend with increasing amounts of “dark silicon,” areas of the chip that must be powered off to avoid overheating.

Heroic efforts are being made within the semiconductor industry to try to keep miniaturization going. But no amount of investment can change the laws of physics. At some point—now not very far

Someone Else’s Computer: The Prehistory of Cloud Computing

“There is no cloud,” goes the quip. “It’s just someone else’s computer.”

The joke gets at a key feature of cloud computing: Your data and the software to process it reside in a remote data center—perhaps owned by Amazon, Google, or Microsoft—which you share with many users even if it feels like it’s yours alone.

Remarkably, this was also true of a popular mode of computing in the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s: time-sharing. Much of today’s cloud computing was directly prefigured in yesterday’s time-sharing. Users connected their terminals—often teletypes—to remote computers owned by a time-sharing company over telephone lines. These remote computers offered a variety of applications and services, as well as data storage. The key to such systems was the operating system, built to rapidly switch among the tasks for the many users, giving the illusion of a dedicated machine.

The pioneering firm Tymshare produced the button shown above along with the largest commercial computer network of its era. Called Tymnet, it spanned the globe and was by the late 1970s larger than the ARPANET. Compare this schematic of Tymnet, detailing all of its nodes, with the sparser schematics of the ARPANET [PDF] from the same era. By 1975, Tymshare